Analyst Ming-Chi Kuo claims that Apple will finally drop the Lightning port for USB-C in its iPhone 2023, rumored to be called the iPhone 15

A reliable leak claims that Apple will finally drop the Lightning port for USB-C in its iPhone 2023 phones

In 2012, Apple caused mass hysteria among iPhone owners by switching the original 30-pin charging port to the current Lightning port.

Now, a trusted leaker claims that Apple may be preparing to change the charging point for a second time.

Analyst Ming-Chi Kuo claims that Apple will finally drop the Lightning port for USB-C in its iPhone 2023, rumored to be called the iPhone 15.

The leak comes shortly after the European Union revealed plans to force all new smartphones – including iPhones – to use USB-C as a standard.

Apple has previously opposed calls for a switch to USB-C, amid allegations that it would produce an “unprecedented volume of electronic waste” and stifle innovation.

Analyst Ming-Chi Kuo claims that Apple will finally drop the Lightning port for USB-C in its iPhone 2023, rumored to be called the iPhone 15

Why did Apple resist USB-C?

Apple has previously opposed calls for a switch to USB-C, amid allegations that it would produce an “unprecedented volume of electronic waste” and stifle innovation.

Speaking last year, an Apple spokesperson said: “We believe regulations mandating coordination between smartphone chargers will stifle rather than encourage innovation.

“It will hurt consumers in Europe and the economy as a whole.”

The company is also believed to prefer its cable due to its higher waterproof rating than USB-C.

In addition, Apple can regulate the quality of lightning cables and accessories through the “Made for ‌iPhone‌” program.

This is also a source of profit that the company will likely be reluctant to give up.

However, Apple switched iPad tablets to USB-C back in 2018.

Swarm Koo, analyst at TF International Securities, reported the news on Twitter this week.

He wrote: “My latest survey indicates that the new 2H23 will ditch the Lightning port and switch to a USB-C port.”

USB-C could improve the iPhone’s transfer and charging speed in hardware designs, but the final specification details still depend on iOS support.

We expect to see existing suppliers associated with Apple’s USB-C ecosystem (eg controller IC, connector) become the focus of the market in the next couple of years, thanks to significant orders of iPhones and accessories embracing USB-C ports.”

The change will make iPhones compatible with many Apple products that already use USB-C chargers, including the latest iPad and MacBook models, as well as most Android smartphones.

In September last year, the European Union decided to make all smartphones have USB-C ports from 2022, in an effort to reduce waste.

Apple has long contested this argument by suggesting that forcing users to move away from the lightning cable would instead create an “unprecedented volume” of waste.

In addition, Apple says the switch could cost consumers up to 1.5 billion euros.

“Apple stands for innovation and cares deeply about the customer experience,” an Apple spokesperson told MailOnline.

Some of Apple’s most innovative ideas go toward making products from recycled and renewable materials.

We share the European Commission’s commitment to protecting the environment and we are already carbon neutral for all of our companies’ emissions around the world, and by 2030, every Apple device and its use will be carbon neutral.

We make products that enhance people’s lives and make everyday tasks easier and more efficient, including how you charge and transfer data on your device.

We remain concerned that strict regulation mandating only one type of connector stifles rather than encourages innovation, which in turn will hurt consumers in Europe and around the world.

Ming-Chi Kuo, an analyst at TF International Securities, leaked the news on Twitter this week

Ming-Chi Kuo, an analyst at TF International Securities, leaked the news on Twitter this week

USB-C is an industry standard connector for transmitting data and power on a single cable

USB-C is an industry standard connector for transmitting data and power on a single cable

What is USB-C?

USB-C is an industry standard connector for transmitting data and power on a single cable.

It was developed by the USB Implementers Forum (USB-IF), a group of companies that have developed, adopted and sponsored the USB standard over the years.

USB-IF members include Apple, Dell, HP, Intel, Microsoft, and Samsung.

At first glance, the USB-C connector looks like the micro USB connector used in old Android smartphones.

However, it is more elliptical and slightly thicker.

One of the best features of USB-C is its ‘flipability’, which means it doesn’t have a ‘correct’ orientation, and can be used either way.

“We look forward to continuing engagement with stakeholders to help find a solution that protects consumer interest, as well as the industry’s ability to innovate and bring exciting new technology to users.”

It is estimated that 420 million mobile phones and other portable electronic devices were sold in the EU last year – many of which required charging or data cables in order to use them.

According to the European Commission, the average person living in the Union owns at least three chargers.

Of those, two are used on a regular basis.

However, 38 percent of people reported not being able to charge their phone at least once because they couldn’t find a compatible charger.

“Chargers power all our essential electronic devices,” said EU Internal Market Commissioner Thierry Breton.

With more and more devices, more and more non-interchangeable or unnecessary chargers are being sold.

We put an end to that.

With our proposal, European consumers will be able to use a single charger for all their portable electronic devices.

This is an “important step to increase comfort and reduce waste,” he added.



2022-05-13 11:06:39

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