With summer officially just around the corner, you might be looking forward to having a barbecue with your friends and family.  But a new study might encourage you to opt for veggie burgers, halloumi, and grilled prawns instead of the usual sausage and beef.

The study found that pescatarians, vegetarians, and vegans have better memory than people who eat meat

Time to get rid of the sausage? The study found that pescatarians, vegetarians, and vegans have better memory than people who eat meat

  • Scientists studied the effects of diet on memory and sleep quality in 62 adults
  • The residents of Pescatar scored the highest and lowest number of carnivores in short-term memory
  • However, the results showed that diet did not appear to play a role in sleep quality

With summer officially just around the corner, you might be looking forward to having a barbecue with your friends and family.

But a new study might encourage you to opt for veggie burgers, halloumi, and grilled prawns instead of the usual sausage and beef burgers.

Researchers from Birkbeck University have revealed that a vegetarian or vegan diet can boost your memory.

“Adherence to a plant-based diet instead of meat improves short-term verbal memory,” said Pinar Sengol, who led the study.

With summer officially just around the corner, you might be looking forward to having a barbecue with your friends and family. But a new study might encourage you to opt for veggie burgers, halloumi, and grilled prawns instead of the usual sausage and beef.

A plant-based diet can reduce the risk of heart disease by up to 52%.

A new study finds that eating a plant-based diet that consists largely of plant foods can reduce the risk of heart disease by up to 52 percent.

A variety of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy, skinless fish, chicken, nuts, and legumes are all key to staving off health problems later in life.

Conversely, researchers advise young adults to limit saturated fat, salt, red meat, sweets, and sugary drinks to prevent heart attacks in middle age.

While they haven’t looked at the reason behind the link, previous research suggests that plant-based diets can lower blood pressure, improve cholesterol and help you lose weight — all risk factors for heart disease.

Previous studies have found various links between diet and physical and mental performance.

“A vegetarian diet is associated with superior cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease,” Singul said.

Mediterranean diets (high in fruits and vegetables) are associated with reduced risk of neurodegenerative diseases and improved cognitive performance.

In the new study, the team set out to evaluate the effects of the diet on memory and sleep quality.

A group of 62 adults aged 40 and over who were either vegetarians, vegans, vegans, omnivores with low meat consumption, or omnivores with high meat consumption were recruited.

To assess their memory, the researchers used the California Verbal Learning Test – one of the most widely used neuropsychological tests.

Meanwhile, their sleep quality was assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index – a self-assessed questionnaire.

The results showed that diet had a significant effect on memory, but not on sleep quality.

On the California Verbal Learning Test, pescatarians performed best, followed by vegetarians and vegans, with carnivores ranked at the bottom.

And in a late recall test, vegans beat piscatars with the highest scores — with omnivores whose diet contained the highest levels of meat scored the lowest.

On the memory test, pescatarians performed best, followed by vegetarians and vegans, with carnivores ranked at the bottom.

On the memory test, pescatarians performed best, followed by vegetarians and vegans, with carnivores ranked at the bottom.

Interestingly, women had significantly better results than men in every diet group except for vegetarians.

The researchers suggest that this is likely due to the fact that females are more likely to follow a vegetarian diet than are men.

However, researchers did not find any clear link between diet and sleep quality.

“This pilot study found that there is a significant effect of female over male sex preference on general memory and a marginal effect of diet on short-term memory, with plant-based diets showing better performance than animal-based diets.” The researchers wrote in their study published in Clinical Nutrition Open Science.

While the reason for the findings remains unclear, previous studies have found various links between diet and memory.

For example, a 2013 study found that a buildup of iron — which is rich in red meat — can cause oxidative damage, to which the brain is particularly susceptible.

Meanwhile, a 2015 study found that the omega-3 fatty acid DHA, which can be found in fish, can improve memory by helping neurons communicate with each other.

The researchers hope that their findings will encourage further research to look at these mechanisms in more detail.

What should a balanced diet look like?

• Eat at least 5 servings of a variety of fruits and vegetables every day. All fresh, frozen, dried and canned fruits and vegetables count

• Layer meals on potatoes, bread, rice, pasta or other starchy carbohydrates, ideally whole grains

• 30 grams of fiber per day: Like eating all of the following: 5 portions of fruit and vegetables, 2 whole-wheat crackers, 2 thick slices of whole-wheat bread, 1 large baked potato with the skin on

• Have some dairy or dairy alternatives (such as soy drinks) choose options that are lower in fat and lower in sugar

• Eat some beans, legumes, fish, eggs, meat and other proteins (including two servings of fish each week, one of which should be fatty)

• Choose unsaturated oils and fats and consume in small quantities

• Drink 6-8 glasses of water daily

• Adults should have less than 6g of salt and 20g of saturated fat for women or 30g for men per day.

Source: NHS Eatwell Guide

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2022-06-07 11:57:37

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