Apple episode: Amazing details about iPhone 14 Pro, hidden Apple Watch camera More questions about MacBook Air

Apple episode: Amazing details about iPhone 14 Pro, hidden Apple Watch camera More questions about MacBook Air

Taking a look at another week of news and headlines from Cupertino, this week’s Apple Loop includes the latest iPhone 14 Pro details, disappointing Mac news, new iPad manufacturing, questions about the release of the MacBook Air, iOS updates from WWDC, hiding the camera in the Apple Watch, and the transition From iPad Pro to MacBook Pro.

The Apple Loop is here to remind you of some of the many discussions that have taken place about Apple over the past seven days (and you can read the weekly summary of Android news here on Forbes).

Two iPhone models will drive Apple’s next release

How many iPhone models will Apple release this year? The obvious answer is four, but with the latest leaks and details, it looks like the best answer will be a couple… iPhone 14 and iPhone 14 Max, as well as iPhone 14 Pro and iPhone 14 Pro Max:

“[This] It fits in with Apple’s broader strategy of increasing differentiation between the standard iPhone 14 and iPhone 14 Pro models. While the iPhone 14 phones will look identical to the iPhone 13, featuring the same notch, the same generation of chipsets and the same rear cameras, the iPhone 14 Pro will have a new design, next-generation chipsets and significantly upgraded cameras. “

(Forbes).

Slowing Down The Next Generation Of Mac Chips

Ahead of the possible unveiling of the next-generation Apple Silicon at WWDC later this month, details about the supposedly powerful M2 chipset may not be as impressive in the performance department as many would expect. TSMC won’t have the latest technology ready until next year:

“Apple’s upcoming update to its silicon lineup – namely the A16 for the new iPhone lineup and the M2 chipset that will supposedly debut in the upcoming MacBook Air – may not meet the high expectations set by many. The production facilities that will be available online offering the N3 N4P manufacturing process will not be ready For mass production until 2023.”

(Forbes).

The iPad supply chain diversified

In response to supply chain issues around Shanghai, Apple is moving some iPad production from China to Vietnam as well as asking supply chain partners to build up a stockpile for any future issues:

“The iPad will become the second major line of Apple products made in the Southeast Asian country, after the AirPods earbud series. The move highlights not only Apple’s ongoing efforts to diversify its supply chain but also the growing importance of Vietnam for the company. Apple shipped 58 million iPads a year past, with the vast majority of hardware suppliers concentrated in China.”

(Nikki Asia).

For air or not for air

With WWDC starting next week, developers aren’t just looking to get details on the latest version of all Apple’s platforms (and look up release dates in developer betas), the question of when Apple will announce its next MacBook Air continues to dominate consumer channels. :

Aside from all the operating systems being previewed, Apple could also launch a 2022 MacBook Air during WWDC 2022. According to the latest edition of the Power On newsletter, Gurman says “If there is any hardware at WWDC, it will likely be on one Mac aside. The company was aiming to launch the next MacBook Air with M2 chipset at the conference. If so, expect a redesigned MacBook Air with next-generation M chipset.

(Mark Gorman via 9to5 Mac).

The iPhone’s new way of doing things

The main changes will, of course, take place in the operating systems and Apple’s annual update for each platform. More important than the individual changes is the general direction Apple will take to bring the platforms closer together and to keep people tightly connected to Apple’s cloud-based services. Jessica Bursztynsky takes a look at the iOS updates we can expect:

Changes to the iPhone include updates to notifications, messages and the Health app, according to Bloomberg. Apple introduced new changes to notifications last year as well, including the option to group them together in a summary at a certain time of day, and a new focus that limits notifications that You see it during specific times.”

(CNBC).

camera per hour

Fun details from Apple’s latest patent roundup this week, with another twist on how to place the camera on your wrist via the Apple Watch. This time, instead of shooting through a watch face, the idea is to use a camera in the digital crown, as the patent explains:

“The lens can be integrated inside the lens aperture and/or behind the aperture of the disc to focus a scene image,” he continues. The image sensor behind the aperture can also be configured to detect the movement of the mark on the dial to allow the image sensor to act as a camera for taking pictures of a scene, and as a sensor that detects the rotation of the dial to sense the rotation input. “

(Apple Insider).

Finally…

With Apple doing its best to blur the lines between the iPad and MacBook (at least for consumers), Federico Viticci has gone from using the iPad Pro as a daily driver to one of his M1 Max-powered MacBook Pro laptops. With no ‘Pro’ apps on the iPad Pro, is this change necessary? Interesting? improved? Settle down with a pre-WWDC coffee to find out the answer.

“For the past six months, I’ve been using my MacBook Pro instead of an iPad Pro to get my work done on a daily basis. I’ve continued to use the iPad Pro to test my shortcuts, read articles, and write in places where I didn’t have enough space for a MacBook, but, overall, I lived macOS lifestyle for half a year now…Here’s my story on how that experience went.”

(Mac Stories).

The Apple Loop brings you featured events for seven days every weekend here at Forbes. Don’t forget to follow me so you don’t miss any coverage in the future. Last week’s Apple Loop can be read here, or this week’s edition of Loop’s sister column, Android Circuit, is also available on Forbes.

2022-06-03 19:01:59

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